Listen up Auckland City Council, Environment Canterbury and the Nelson City Council and any other politically correct bodies who’ve been quick to jump on the climate change emergency bandwagon. Sucked in by hundreds of councils worldwide saying “action on climate change has to be prioritised at all levels of society and government”, you’d all better listen-up to the new kids in town talking about “mass delusion”.

The Aussies pipped us at the post by becoming enlightened before we’d even thought about the economic downside of our adopted climate change delusion. It’s not hard to understand why our frenemies jumped the gun: they are not keen to stick a knife into the back of their oil and gas industry or tell farmers to cull their farting cows, and they are certainly much more enthusiastic about protecting their lucrative mining industry than we are.

While we are stuck in the dark ages, beating our breasts about the “impending climate disaster”, 75 Australians stuck their heads above the parapet to say in unison “CO2 is good for the planet“. Shock, horror: conservative politicians, industry and mining leaders are the Australian contingent of CLINTEL, the global climate intelligence group putting the science back into climate science.

CLINTEL wrote a letter to the UN secretary general, António Guterres, and the UN’s chief climate negotiator, Patricia Espinosa Cantellano, describing the benefits of cutting greenhouse gas emissions as “imagined”.

“The letter says: “Scientists should openly address the uncertainties and exaggerations in their predictions of global warming, while politicians should dispassionately count the real benefits as well as the imagined costs of adaptation to global warming, and the real costs as well as the imagined benefits of mitigation.

The Guardian


This worldwide movement is challenging the UN wealth distribution machine, aka climate change emergency, which has spread into local government statements like the following from Environment Canterbury.

The science is irrefutable – climate change is already impacting ecosystems and communities around the world, with increasingly frequent and severe storms, floods and droughts; melting polar ice sheets; sea level rise and coastal inundation and erosion; and impacts on biodiversity including species loss and extinction.”

Environment Canterbury


Actually, the science is refutable – which is exactly why 500 scientists bothered to write to the UN.

Seasonal weather storms cause coastal erosion and sea levels are currently rising at an average rate of 30 centimetres every 100 years, which is not catastrophic. Whether they will continue at this rate is not clear, and as for species extinction, there are prevailing factors other than global warming.

“Our planet is now in the midst of its sixth mass extinction of plants and animals — the sixth wave of extinctions in the past half-billion years.

We’re currently experiencing the worst spate of species die-offs since the loss of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. Although extinction is a natural phenomenon, it occurs at a natural “background” rate of about one to five species per year.

Unlike past mass extinctions, caused by events like asteroid strikes, volcanic eruptions, and natural climate shifts, the current crisis is almost entirely caused by us — humans. In fact, 99 percent of currently threatened species are at risk from human activities, primarily those driving habitat loss, introduction of exotic species, and global warming.”

Biological Diversity


Scientists agree the earth is warming, but by how much and why, is not clear. Climate change predictors of impending catastrophe blame human intervention, arguing that unless we change our behaviour we will experience climate disaster.

Until now, climate change deniers of this impending doom have been largely quiet, so the emergence of a large group of prominent scientists and professionals changes everything. Climate change scaremongers no longer get to peddle their theories about man-made climate change unchallenged. As The BDF‘s resident writer on climate change, WH, says: the science is far from settled.

I’m not sorry to say that unless the greenies evolve, their days are numbered. They’ve been nothing but an expensive pain in the butt destroying our farming, transport, mining and energy industries and they’ve scared the children!

Teachers should hasten back to their classrooms with revised curricula to teach the important stuff. Now that we’re clear about the imagined climate change doom and gloom, we can look forward to a bright and prosperous future.

Teachers can dispel student anxiety that the end of the world is nigh, and instead tell them about the desperately needed scientists, geologists and mining engineers for the oil, gas and mining boom awaiting us when this toxic handbrake is released.