The word for today is…

injunction (noun) – 1. The act or an instance of enjoining; a command, directive, or order.
2. (Law) A court order requiring a party to refrain from doing a particular act or to do a particular act.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Injunction derives, via Anglo-French and Late Latin, from the Latin verb injungere, which in turn is based on jungere, meaning “to join.” Like our verb enjoin, injungere means “to direct or impose by authoritative order or with urgent admonition.” (Not surprisingly, enjoin is also a descendant of injungere.) Injunction has been around in English since at least the 15th century, when it began life as a word meaning “authoritative command.” In the 16th century, it developed a legal second sense applying to a court order. It has also been used as a synonym of conjunction, another jungere descendant meaning “union,” but that sense is extremely rare.

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korau
Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother's and father's folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers. His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he's now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.