The word for today is…

propitiate (verb):

: to gain or regain the favour or goodwill of

Source : Merriam -Webster

Etymology : Like its synonym “appease,” propitiate means “to ease the anger or disturbance of,” but there are subtle differences between the two terms as well. “Appease” usually implies quieting insistent demands by making concessions, whereas “propitiate” tends to suggest averting the anger or malevolence of a superior being. In fact, “propitiate” often occurs in contexts involving deities, spirits, or other preternatural forces. You might “appease” your hunger, but to speak more colorfully, you could “propitiate the gods of hunger.”

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David Theobald

David is a retired surgeon originally from London who came to New Zealand twenty-seven years ago after being delayed in Singapore for thirteen years on leaving the UK. He was coerced into studying Latin...