The word for today is…

pulchritude (noun) –

: physical comeliness

Source : Merriam -Webster

Etymology : If English poet John Keats was right when he wrote that “a thing of beauty is a joy forever,” then pulchritude should bring bliss for many years to come. That word has already served English handsomely for centuries; it has been used since the 1400s. It’s a descendant of the Latin adjective pulcher, which means “beautiful.” Pulcher hasn’t exactly been a wellspring of English terms, but it did give us both pulchritude and pulchritudinous, an adjective meaning “attractive” or “beautiful.” The verb pulchrify (a synonym of beautify), the noun pulchritudeness (same meaning as pulchritude), and the adjective pulchrous (meaning “fair or beautiful”) are other pulcher offspring, but those terms have proved that, in at least some linguistic cases, beauty is fleeting.

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The BFD Word of the Day
David Theobald

David Theobald

David is a retired surgeon originally from London who came to New Zealand twenty-six years ago having got delayed in Singapore for thirteen years after leaving the UK. He was coerced into studying Latin...