The word for today is…

expropriate (verb) –

1 : to deprive of possession or proprietary rights
2 : to transfer (the property of another) to one’s own possession

Source : Merriam -Webster

Etymology : If you guessed that expropriate has something in common with the verb appropriate, you’re right. Both words ultimately derive from the Latin adjective proprius, meaning “own.” Expropriate came to us by way of the Medieval Latin verb expropriare, itself from Latin ex- (“out of” or “from”) and proprius. Appropriate descends from Late Latin appropriare, which joins proprius and Latin ad- (“to” or “toward”). Both the verb appropriate (“to take possession of” or “to set aside for a particular use”) and the adjective appropriate (“fitting” or “suitable”) have been with us since the 15th century, and expropriate has been a part of the language since at least 1611. Other proprius descendants in English include proper and property.

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The BFD Word of the Day
David Theobald

David Theobald

David is a retired surgeon originally from London who came to New Zealand twenty-six years ago having got delayed in Singapore for thirteen years after leaving the UK. He was coerced into studying Latin...