The word for today is…

assail (verb) – 1. To attack violently, as with blows or military force; assault.
2. To attack verbally, as with ridicule or censure.
3. To trouble or beset, as with questions or doubts.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Assail comes from an Anglo-French verb, assaillir, which itself traces back to the Latin verb assilire (“to leap upon”). Assilire combines the prefix ad- (“to, toward”) with the Latin verb salire, meaning “to leap.” (Salire is the root of a number of English words related to jumping or leaping, such as somersault and sally, as well as assault, a synonym of assail.) When assail was first used in the 13th century, it meant “to make a violent physical attack upon.” By the early 15th century, English speakers were using the term to mean “to attack with words or arguments.” Now the verb can refer to any kind of aggressive encounter, even if it is not necessarily violent or quarrelsome, as in “Upon entering the room, we were assailed by a horrible odour.”

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korau
Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother's and father's folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers. His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he's now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.