The word for today is…

sawbones (noun) – A physician, especially a surgeon.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Sawbones cut its first literary tooth in Charles Dickens’s 1837 novel The Pickwick Papers, when Sam Weller says to Mr. Pickwick, “Don’t you know what a sawbones is, sir? … I thought everybody know’d as a sawbones was a surgeon.” An evocative term that calls to mind the saws that 19th-century surgeons used to perform amputations, sawbones quickly became an established member of the English language, employed by such authors as H. G. Wells, Mark Twain, and Robert Louis Stevenson. Mercifully, medical technology has improved dramatically since then (the surgical saws used in procedures today are a far cry from the primitive tools of yesteryear), but the word sawbones is still used, often in a humorous context.

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Korau
Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother's and father's folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers. His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he's now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.