The word for today is…

desuetude (noun) – A state of disuse or inactivity.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Desuetude must be closely related to disuse, right? Wrong. Despite the similarities between them, desuetude and disuse derive from two different Latin verbs. Desuetude comes from suescere, a word that means “to become accustomed” (suescere also gave us the word custom). Disuse descends from uti, which means “to use.” (That Latin word also gave us use and utility.) Although less common, desuetude hasn’t fallen into desuetude yet, and it was put to good use in the past, as in the 17th-century writings of Scottish Quaker Robert Barclay, who wrote, “The weighty Truths of God were neglected, and, as it were, went into Desuetude.”

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Korau
Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother's and father's folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers. His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he's now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.