The word for today is…

brackish (adj) – 1. (a) Being or containing water that is somewhat salty but less salty than sea water.
(b) Having a somewhat salty taste or smell.
2. Distasteful; unpalatable:

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : When the word brackish first appeared in English in the 1500s, it simply meant “salty,” as did its Dutch parent brac. Then, as now, brackish water could simply be a mixture of saltwater and freshwater. Since that time, however, brackish has developed the additional meanings of “unpalatable” or “distasteful”—presumably because of the undrinkable quality of saltwater. “The brackish water that we drink / Creeps with a loathsome slime, / And the bitter bread they weigh in scales / Is full of chalk and lime.” As this use from Oscar Wilde’s “Ballad of Reading Gaol” illustrates, brackish water can also include things other than salt that make it unpleasant to drink.

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Korau
Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother's and father's folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers. His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he's now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.